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    Black Cuillin

    The peaks of the Black Cuillin are mainly composed of gabbro, a very rough black igneous rock which provides a superb grip for mountaineers, and basalt, which can be very slippery when wet.

    The summits of the Cuillin are bare rock, jagged in outline and with steep cliffs and deep cut corries and gullies.

    Twelve Black Cuillin peaks are listed as Munros, though one of them, Blaven, is part of a group of outliers separated from the main ridge by Glen Sligachan.

    Please note: Whilst we try to replicate each colour on our website, colour on screen may vary due to a number of factors including screen resolution. We therefore advise that you order a colour card or sample pot to check actual finished colour.

    £1.00£52.50
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    Lealt Falls

    Lealt is a crofting settlement on the western coastline of the Sound of Raasay on the Trotternish peninsula of Skye.  The River Lealt which gives its name to Lealt, passes through on the way to the Sound of Raasay.

    The Lealt Valley Diatomite Railway was a 2 ft (610 mm) narrow gauge which ran parallel with the River Lealt.

    The western end of the line was at Loch Cuithir, where diatomite - known locally as Cailc (Scottish Gaelic for chalk) - was extracted from the lochbed and dried on wire nets. The seaward terminus had warehouses on the cliff-top at Invertote. At the base of the cliff was a factory where the diatomite was kiln dried, ground and calcined. The line was extended from the factory onto a pier into the Sound of Raasay. During its existence, the Skye Diatomite Company extracted 2000 tons of diatomite.

    Please note: Whilst we try to replicate each colour on our website, colour on screen may vary due to a number of factors including screen resolution. We therefore advise that you order a colour card or sample pot to check actual finished colour.

    £1.00£52.50
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    Loch Bay

    Stein is a crofting township, situated on the north eastern shore of Loch Bay, in the west of the Waternish peninsula.

    In 1790, the British Fisheries Society planned a fishing port to be designed by Thomas Telford. However, poor management of the project, and the lack of enthusiasm shown by the local crofting population for fishing, meant only a small proportion of the scheme was constructed.

    Only a few structures were completed to Telford's design, including a pier, a storehouse and possibly the now-ruined smithy.

    The 18th-century Stein Inn is the oldest pub on Skye.

    The village of Dunvegan lies approximately 5 miles south along the B888 road. Near the junction of this road with the A850, just 6 kilometres (3.7 mi) from Stein is the Fairy Bridge.

    According to tradition as related by R.C. MacLeod one of the chiefs of Clan MacLeod married a fairy; however, after twenty years she is forced to leave him and return to fairyland. She bade farewell to the chief at the Fairy Bridge and gave him the Fairy Flag. She promised that if it was waved in times of danger and distress, help would be given on three occasions.

    This flag can be found on display in Dunvegan Castle.

    Please note: Whilst we try to replicate each colour on our website, colour on screen may vary due to a number of factors including screen resolution. We therefore advise that you order a colour card or sample pot to check actual finished colour.

    £1.00£52.50
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    Loch Coruisk

    Loch Coruisk is an inland fresh-water loch, lying at the foot of the Black Cuillin. Loch Coruisk is reputed to be the home of a water horse.

    Sir Walter Scott visited the loch in 1814 and described it vividly:

    “Rarely human eye has known

    A scene so stern as that dread lake,

    With its dark ledge of barren stone...”

    Lord Tennyson reported more prosaically:

    “Loch Coruisk, said to be the wildest scene in the Highlands, I failed in seeing. After a fatiguing expedition over the roughest ground on a wet day we arrived at the banks of the loch, and made acquaintance with the extremest tiptoes of the hills, all else being thick wool-white fog.”

    Please note: Whilst we try to replicate each colour on our website, colour on screen may vary due to a number of factors including screen resolution. We therefore advise that you order a colour card or sample pot to check actual finished colour.

    £1.00£52.50
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    Portree Harbour

    Is the largest town on Skye .  Portree has a harbour, fringed by cliffs, with a pier designed by Thomas Telford

    The current name, Port Rìgh translates as 'king's port', possibly from a visit by King James V of Scotland in 1540.

    However this etymology has been contested, since James did not arrive in peaceful times.

    The older name appears to have been Port Ruighe(adh), meaning "slope harbour".

    Prior to the 16th century the settlement's name was Kiltaraglen ('the church of St. Talarican') from Gaelic Cill Targhlain.

    Please note: Whilst we try to replicate each colour on our website, colour on screen may vary due to a number of factors including screen resolution. We therefore advise that you order a colour card or sample pot to check actual finished colour.

    £1.00£52.50
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    Spirit of Skye

    Of all the remote, rugged and rough regions of Scotland, nothing quite matches the Isle of Skye.

    Its landscape – harsh, dramatic, stunningly beautiful and awe-inspiring – is almost other-worldly and once experienced is never forgotten. And its lochs, glens and bens, including the challenging Cuillin Mountains, are set firm in time, unchanged by all that the harshest of climates has thrown at them over the centuries. More than any other part of the British Isles, you can feel the weight of history here, the struggles and battles, the bloodshed and horror are hidden in every rock and crevice, but not very deeply. Please note: Whilst we try to replicate each colour on our website, colour on screen may vary due to a number of factors including screen resolution. We therefore advise that you order a colour card or sample pot to check actual finished colour.
    £1.00£52.50